phiffer.org

Dan Phiffer Dan Phiffer builds websites, makes art, and teaches in NYC

TSOYA interviews Ira Glasswww.maximumfun.org

For my Multimedia 1 class tomorrow we’ll be covering audio, looking at interviewing as a form. I’m going to play an excerpt of an interview with Ira Glass from one of my longtime favorite podcasts, The Sound of Young America. I’m most interested in the last part, which starts around 33:38.

MP3 link

As part of the weekly homework assignment we’ll listen to a Studs Terkel piece from Fresh Air.

Link

Events for March 1-7 2010

  • Tonight I’ll be going to the final workshop at Trade School. The topic being the future of the school itself:

    As people with creative projects, we understand the value of creative labor regardless of its market value. Why don’t we share our resources? What happens when we decide how much our work is worth to each other? Let’s trade our skills, spaces, and objects.

    It says there aren’t any seats available, but I’m going to swing by anyway. Starts at 7pm.

  • On Thursday Mushon and Michael are giving a talk and launching their book at Eyebeam. I completely forgot about this when I agreed to be a contestant on geek Jeopardy.

  • Friday through Sunday there’s the Social Media Art Camp (or “SMartCAMP”) conference that I’ll be attending.

Elephant storywww.davidchancellor.com

David Chancellor got 3rd place in the People in the News category from the World Press Photo awards.

Local villagers fall upon the body of a dead elephant, starved of meat they reduce the huge carcass to bones in under 2 hours.

24 hours later the bones have also gone, all that’s visible are the fresh tracks from the remaining elephants returning to Mozambique under cover of darkness.

Link

Roger Ebert gets his voice backrogerebert.suntimes.com

Well, kind of, thanks to a company that custom builds text-to-speech voices. Ebert’s new voice is compiled from his vast accumulated archive of reviews and commentary tracks.

CereProc didn’t need to hear me speaking a specific word in order for my “voice” to say it. They needed lots of words to determine the general idea of how I might say a word. They transcribed and programmed and tweaked and fiddled, and early this February, sent me the files for a beta version of my voice. I played it for Chaz, and she said, yes, she could tell it was me. For one thing it knew exactly how I said “I.”

CereProc is now blending in my audio snippets for “Casablanca,” where I sound enthusiastic, and “Floating Weeds,” where I sound calm and respectful. It’s nice to think of all these great movies sloshing around and coming out as my voice.

Link (See also)

The Mac startup sound and Sosumivimeo.com

A great interview with the former head sound guy at Apple. The intro is in Dutch but the interview itself continues in English.

A gentleman in the comments with a NSFW user icon offers this bit of HTML geekery:

If you look at the Apple’s website source code, the element containing their copyright notice it’s actually called “sosumi”

Link via John Gruber

A brief homage to Franklin Gothicwww.moma.org

Franklin Gothic is the basis of MoMA’s typographic identity. August Hefner found some examples of Franklin Gothic being used at the museum dating back to the 1930s. One of the signs reads:

The public is urgently requested to visit the Galleries in the morning, from 10 to 12 and evening from 8 to 10 in order to avoid congesting the elevator service. If this request is complied with, it will not be necessary to charge admission.

I didn’t realize that the museum’s adaptation of the typeface, MoMA Gothic, was created by the same type designer as the original.

Link

Reading J.D. Salinger under Antarcticavimeo.com

A few days ago I linked to an article on Gareth Long’s lenticular interpretations of 90s era J.D. Salinger book covers.

Due to the visual effect of viewing these from different angles, video does better justice to the works than a sequence of photos. Helpfully, Gareth Long provides such videos on his website. I’ve taken these and, with permission from the artist, edited them into a single clip. I also added a sound track, field recordings taken below Antarctic ice shelfs. The two seemed to fit somehow.

Link

How To Speakisites.harvard.edu

Patrick Winston is a professor at Harvard who gave a great lecture on how to give a great lecture.

He emphasizes how to start a lecture, cycling in on the material, using verbal punctuation to indicate transitions, describing “near misses” that strengthen the intended concept, and asking questions. He also talks about using the blackboard, overhead projections, props, and “how to stop.”

I was reminded of this after seeing some 404 errors in my server logs to a podcast version of the videos I put together, but forgot to transfer to my new server. To download these into iTunes (and onto your video-enabled iPod), go to the Advanced menu, choose Subscribe to Podcast and enter: //phiffer.org/etc/how-to-speak.xml

Link (See also)

Events for February 24-28, 2010

In no particular order: