phiffer.org

Dan Phiffer Dan Phiffer is an Internet enthusiast based in Troy, NY

Next Epoch Seed Librarynextepochseedlibrary.com

I made Ellie and Anne a website for their project, the Next Epoch Seed Library.

[nextepochseedlibrary.com](http://nextepochseedlibrary.com)
nextepochseedlibrary.com

If the website design looks familiar, it’s because I used the same WordPress theme I developed for Ellie’s website.

See also: Ellie’s essay about the project

Link

Feral Landscape Lovebrooklynrail.org

Ellie wrote an essay that was recently published in the Brooklyn Rail. She makes a case for weeds, in urban spaces that are lacking in green spaces.

Based on growing evidence for the role of greenspace in mental health and the importance of plant life for a slew of environmental services (including temperature regulation, air quality improvement, and soil stabilization), the plant community I work with is beneficial and should be embraced. A small but growing cadre of defenders respectfully refer to these plants as “spontaneous urban plants” that inhabit “novel ecosystems” which are in urgent need of further study.

Forest Enclosure, Johnson Avenue. [Feral Landscape Typologies](http://ellieirons.com/projects/feral-typologies/)
Forest Enclosure, Johnson Avenue. Feral Landscape Typologies

To the average city-dweller, and compared to their cultivated counterparts, the species I advocate for can appear “messy” and unrefined: flowers that are too small, seed pods that are too big, thorns that tear clothing, roots that reach into brick and asphalt. They may seem indicative of disrepair, of indolence, of a community down on its luck or still climbing towards peak gentrification. It is perhaps this sensibility that drives building superintendents and maintenance crews out into the streets to “clean up” (massacre) these plants on a regular basis.

As the Weedy Species Alliance motto goes: “Let the Dandelions Live!”

See also: Feral Landscape Typologies and The Next Epoch Seed Library

Link

The Next Epoch Seed Librarymedium.com

Ellie on why killing weeds is counterproductive:

Is it really worth raging against the geographical pedigree of a plant introduced 200 years ago if it’s functioning to stabilize soil, feed late season pollinators, generate oxygen, cool the ground, and improve human mental health? Sure, there are villainous weeds out there (think Kudzu), but it’s all context-based, and plant communities that suffer from being overrun by a weedy villain are often not in the best shape to begin with.

“Collecting seeds is such a pleasant activity—it puts the collector in touch with her/his local ecosystem, both metaphorically and physically.”
“Collecting seeds is such a pleasant activity—it puts the collector in touch with her/his local ecosystem, both metaphorically and physically.”

Make sure you scroll all the way down to see all the lovely weed portraits.

See also: Next Epoch Seed Library on Ellie’s website.

Link

Ellie Irons: Speculative Arboricultureblog.ellieirons.com

This one has been fun to watch come together:

Combining found natural materials (dead wood, foliage) with electrical wiring and living plants like moss and lichen, the sculptural installation took the form of a networked branch riddled with wires that seem to be either drawing power from or conveying power too the surrounding built environment. I filmed the sculpture as I built it, combining footage shot in the studio with details from the surprisingly vibrant forest outside my studio. The result is a piece that slowly reveals an ecosystem in which the lines between technological and biological evolution appear increasingly blurred.

It’s also worth relinking the Bruce Sterling talk which is also amazing.

Link