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Dan Phiffer Dan Phiffer is an Internet enthusiast based in Troy, NY

Wall Street Isn’t Winning It’s Cheatingwww.rollingstone.com

Matt Taibbi in Rolling Stone:

Success is the national religion, and almost everyone is a believer. Americans love winners. But that’s just the problem. These guys on Wall Street are not winning—they’re cheating. And as much as we love the self-made success story, we hate the cheater that much more.

And also this part:

The banks borrow billions at zero and lend mortgages to us at four percent, or credit cards at twenty or twenty-five percent. This is essentially an official government license to be rich, handed out at the expense of prudent ordinary citizens, who now no longer receive much interest on their CDs or other saved income. It is virtually impossible to not make money in banking when you have unlimited access to free money, especially when the government keeps buying its own cash back from you at market rates.

Your average chimpanzee couldn’t fuck up that business plan, which makes it all the more incredible that most of the too-big-to-fail banks are nonetheless still functionally insolvent, and dependent upon bailouts and phony accounting to stay above water. Where do the protesters go to sign up for their interest-free billion-dollar loans?

All In The Mind on Dolphin brainswww.abc.net.au

All In The Mind is a great Australian radio show on a variety of mind-related topics: “dreaming to depression, addiction to artificial intelligence, consciousness to coma, psychoanalysis to psychopathy, free will to forgetting.”

The most recent episode describes dolphin brain biology and explores the philosophical status of the animals, as well as the ethics of keeping seemingly intelligent animals captive in aquariums.

MP3 Link

The segment includes an interview with Thomas I. White (starting around 22:20) who wrote In Defense of Dolphins. He argues that dolphins have cognitive traits that qualify them as “non-human persons.”

Link

Luxury goods make you selfishwww.reuters.com

The students who viewed luxury goods were significantly more likely than the second group to endorse production of a new car that might pollute the environment, launch a new software with bugs, or market a video game that might induce violence, according to the study.

“Results … suggest that when primed with luxury, people endorsed self-interested decisions that could potentially harm others,” the researchers said in the study.

Link via Fiona Carswell

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